How to Use Compare Strings in Java

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Sometimes when comparing strings in Java it is possible to run into a bug forcing you to refresh the process. It all depends on what kind of program you are using, and below we explain the best option for comparing strings.

Ways to compare strings

Generally, there are three ways to test strings in Java. You can use ==, .equals (), or Objects.equals ().

How are they different? == tests for the reference quality in strings meaning finding out whether the two objects are the same. On the other hand, .equals () tests whether the two strings are of equal value logically. Finally, Objects.equals () tests for any nulls in the two strings then determine whether to call .equals ().

Ideal operator to use

Well this has been subject to lots of debates because each of the three operators have their unique set of strengths and weaknesses. Example, == is often a preferred option when comparing object reference, but there are cases where it may seem to compare string values as well.

However, what you get is a falls value because Java creates an illusion that you are comparing values but in the real sense you are not. Consider the two cases below:

#Case 1:
String a="Test";
String b="Test";
if(a==b) ===> true

#Case 2:
String nullString1 = null;
String nullString2 = null;
//evaluates to true
nullString1 == nullString2;
//throws an exception
nullString1.equals(nullString2);

So, it’s way better to use each operator when testing the specific attribute it’s designed for. But in almost all cases, Objects.equals () is a more universal operator thus experience web developers opt for it.

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